DR Anita Radini from BioArch (University of York, UK) Visiting Professor in Rome!

Thursday 5. July 2018. at 10:19h

Dr Anita Radini, from BioArCh (University of York) has recently joint the HIDDEN FOODS Team as an Invited Visiting Professorship at the "DANTE" Laboratory for the study of Diet and Ancient Technology, funded by Prof. E. Cristiani as part of her ERC Starting Grant Project. Anita and Emanuela are working closely with Medical Doctors of the Department of Oral and Maxillo Facial Sciences of Rome on various aspects of dental calculus research in ancient skeletal and modern living populations. This venture will further consolidate the research links and collaboration between Archaeology at York a...

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NEW! Dental calculus and isotopes provide direct evidence of fish and plant consumption in Mesolithic Mediterranean

Thursday 5. July 2018. at 10:10h

A new contribution from the HIDDEN FOODS team! We use a combination of dental calculus and stable isotope analyses to dismantle the assessed role of marine resources and plant foods in Holocene forager subsistence economy in the Central Mediterranean. ...

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Flotation at Vlakno Cave (Dugi Otok)

Monday 2. January 2017. at 13:16h

In September 2016 Dr Giuseppina Mutri has carried out a extensive flotation of the Mesolithic layers excavated this year at the site of Vlakno Cave (Dugi Otok, Croatia). Samples of charcoal and charred remains of plants collected this yer are currently under study.

Dr Dario Vujević, site director and professor at the University of Zadar was involved as project partner. ...

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HIDDEN FOODS first results on dental calculus from the Danube Gorges (central Balkans) published in PNAS!

Thursday 1. September 2016. at 15:28h

The starch record entrapped in dental calculus of Mesolithic human teeth from the site of Vlasac in the central Balkans provides direct evidence that complex Late Mesolithic foragers of this region consumed domesticated cereal grains.

DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1603477113

From the web: NBC News, Science Daily, antiquity.ac.uk
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First flotation activity at Romito Cave (Calabria, Italy)

Thursday 9. June 2016. at 18:10h

In June 2016, a systematic flotation activity will start at the site of Grotta del Romito in southern Italy. Dr G. Mutri (University of Cambridge) will carry out the activity in collaboration with Prof. F. Martini and Dr Domenico Lo Vetro (University of Florence). ...

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Flotation activity at Vlakno Cave (Dugi Otok, Croatia)

Monday 7. March 2016. at 17:52h

In November 2015 Dr Giuseppina Mutri (University of Cambridge) started a systematic and extensive flotation of the Mesolithic layers excavated at the site of Vlakno Cave on Dugi Otok, wonderful Island in the Adriatic Sea (Croatia). All sediment excavated during the November campaign was selected for flotation and processed using fresh water. The numerous samples of charcoal and charred remains of plants collected during the flotation are currently under study.

Dr Dario Vujević, site director and professor at the University of Zadar was involved as project partner.
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New fieldwork activity at the site of Vrbicka Cave (Montenegro)

Saturday 3. October 2015. at 09:01h

In November 2015, excavations resumed at Vrbička Cave. Flotation samples were collected from all excavated layers (Late and Early Neolithic, Mesolithic). In the course of the field season these were transported to an artificial lake near Nikšić for an extensive programme of flotation. All samples from Mesolithic levels were processed and partly sorted, yielding charcoal and charred remains of plants. Previously, the Mesolithic layer yielded the remains of hazelnut husks (identified by D. Filipović, Belgrade, Serbia) while charcoal identification (by E. Allué, Tarragona, Spain) determined ...

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Systematic flotation at Grotta del Cavallo (Apulia)

Wednesday 26. August 2015. at 21:18h

In October 2015, Dr Giuseppina Mutri (University of Cambridge) carried out a systematic flotation activity at the site of Grotta del Cavallo in southern Italy. Flotation samples were collected from Middle and Early Upper Palaeolithic layers excavated at the site. At the site, soil samples were selected for an extensive programme of flotation using sea water. Successively, the samples were transported in the lab and re-washed with fresh water in order to avoid the formation of salt concretions. Numerous charcoals and charred remains of plants collected during the flotation are currently under s...

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